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Posts Tagged ‘puppy mill rescues’

An update on Maggie from the mill – Progress!

July 30, 2014 23 comments

I’ve been a bit sporadic in my posts lately, but I wanted to at least give an update on little Miss Maggie.

Do you know that it has already been a year since Maggie was rescued? On July 16, 2013, she and her babies were rescued and taken to the Animal Humane Society (AHS), where she received medical care, food, water and kindness. In the days that followed, she learned that people could be kind and gentle. She learned it from her first foster mom, Sabrina, who taught her about leashed walks, living in a real home and that steak tastes quite good (the steak was in celebration of a judge awarding her custody to AHS).

With this new freedom came opportunities. A new place to live, time to heal and a chance to learn how to be a real dog. She came into Minnesota Sheltie Rescue and soon after that into my home. I have given her time and space. I let her learn from my dogs what a dog’s life can be like. So far,¬†she has learned bones and ice cream are delicious, and everyone goes outside in the morning and again at night. She has also learned that cheese is good, but it is even more interesting and fun when it is hidden in dog puzzles or comes after touching my hand. She has learned how fun it is to roll in the freshly cut grass and that one must be quick if they want to get a treat before one of the other dogs. She is learning new things every day and in the process becoming more of the dog she was meant to be.

Here are just a few highlights of Maggie’s progress. Don’t miss Maggie’s two videos at the end of this post!

Maggie waits for cheese.

Are you going to throw me some cheese or am I going to have to dance for it?

Someone was worried the other party goers might steal her ice cream treat. #maggie

The best part about being a real dog is birthday parties and ice cream!

I'm sorry. What is this "share" you speak of?

Bully sticks are meant to be savored. If only Jasper and Daisy understood this.

Nervous, but not Too nervous to not take the cheese

I’m a little scared up here on this table, but yes, I will take a little cheese. Thank you.

Someone got groomed today and did really well! Of course, she got lots of cheese too!

This grooming thing isn’t half bad when you go slow and feed me cheese.

Maggie learns Watch me

Hand targeting with Maggie (She has only done this once outside. Too many noises outside.)

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The Charity Game of Love: Give to the Max Day (Today!)

November 13, 2013 5 comments
Cupcake - A Minnesota Sheltie Rescue adoptee and frequent blog guest. :)

Cupcake – A Minnesota Sheltie Rescue adoptee and frequent blog guest. ūüôā

It’s like the most¬†competitive game on earth, but in this case it involves love, money and it helps out Minnesota charities in a big way.

What is it? Give to the Max Day and it starts at midnight tonight!

Give to the Max Day is the one day of the year when charities from around the state of Minnesota compete to raise money for their charities and have a chance to not only double their donations via matching grants, but also win additional prize money that can be used to do even more to help their communities in the coming year .

For many charities, like Minnesota Sheltie Rescue (MNSR), it is a day that can determine how many Shelties we can save and how many will get a chance at a new life in a loving home. The money raised, starting at midnight tonight through midnight tomorrow night, will help us to continue to save Shelties like the ones we just took in from the Pine River puppy mill raid or the ones that were left behind when their owner died unexpectedly. 

Give to the Max Day is a big deal. Huge.

Last year, Minnesota Sheltie Rescue¬†(MNSR) was lucky enough to come in 2nd place in the small charity category. It allowed us to say “Yes” to many Shelties in need, including Shelties from Pine River puppy mill raid.

Here are just some of the things Minnesota Sheltie Rescue did this year: 

  • Spent $45,000.00 in veterinary expenses in 2013 (and the year is not over yet!). This total does not include expenses for grooming, food, supplies and training.
  • Took in 53 Shelties (30 of which came to us just this fall).
  • Placed 36 of the 41 Shelties currently in our program into loving foster homes (5 are still waiting to be placed into available foster homes).
  • Helped Sheltie owners seeking information on Sheltie health and behavioral issues.
  • Educated Sheltie owners on keeping their Sheltie safe and what to do if they get lost.

Since 2003, Minnesota Sheltie Rescue has placed 710 Shelties into new homes. We’d like to continue to say “Yes” to more Shelties in need and make that number grow even more.

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Patty Ana is one of the MNSR Shelties who has been helped by your donations in 2013. Patty had a large mammary tumor removed after she came into rescue. She also had a dental and was spayed and received routine veterinary care. Patty was adopted this summer and now is enjoying life with her forever family.

You can help us do so by contributing to Minnesota Sheltie Rescue in the next 24 hours. Can’t give much? That’s okay. Remember, for every dollar you donate, a Minnesota organization is contributing a matching dollar amount.

If you give $5, MNSR gets $10. Not only that, but MNSR also has a chance to win a random drawing of $1000 every hour and the random drawing for  $10,000 at the end of the evening.

So when is the best time to give during Give to the Max Day? During the power hours listed below. The charities that receive the most donations in these hours win a $1000 prize grant for a total of $5,000 in prize grants each power hour!

  • 2:00-2:59 a.m.
  • 5:00-5:59 a.m.
  • 5:00-5:59 p.m.
  • 6:00-6:59 p.m.
  • 11:00-11:59 p.m.

How to donate: Click here and make a contribution. That’s it.

Oh yeah. Did I mention that you can see how we’re doing on our Give to the Max Minnesota Sheltie Rescue¬†page too? To see where we rank on the main LeaderBoard, Go here. As of 6 AM Central Time we are in 8th place on the Small Nonprofit Leader Board!

Check it out several times a day and cheer us on!

Thanks for your support!

What happens to a 14 year old Sheltie when her owner passes away? Fortunately for Lady & her 11 year old son, Jasper, MN Sheltie Rescue was able to take them in. Thanks to your generous donations during last year's Give to the Max, Lady and Jasper received the veterinary care they needed. Lady's care alone was almost $1000.

What happens to a 14 year old Sheltie when her owner passes away? Fortunately for Lady & her 11 year old son, Jasper, MN Sheltie Rescue was able to take them in. Thanks to your generous donations during last year’s Give to the Max, Lady and Jasper received the veterinary care they needed. Lady’s care alone was almost $1000.

Jasper came in with his mom, Lady, after their owner died. They are looking to go to their forever home together.

Jasper came in with his mom, Lady, after their owner died. They are looking to go to their forever home together.

Meet sisters, Pearl and Roxie, also with Minnesota Sheltie Rescue and looking for their forever home. You will fall in love with them after you watch this video.

Daisy’s belly rubs – A look back

October 3, 2013 13 comments
Can I get a belly rub?

Can I get a belly rub?

Today I am taking another look back to the early years when Daisy first came to live with me.  Daisy is a former puppy mill breeding dog who was estimated to be four years old at the time I adopted her. She was afraid of everyone and everything. She practically crawled on the ground the first few days she came to live with me.  It highlights the progress Daisy has made since I adopted her in 2007.

I hope it gives hope to those who have a damaged or unsocialized dog. Progress can be made. It takes time and patience and often happens in fits and starts – for every step forward there are two steps back, but it is so rewarding when you start to take those steps forward.  The key is to never give up hope. You need a lot of patience and understanding. You also need learn to learn to celebrate the small successes.

The first time was when I was laying on my belly on the living room floor. I was typing away on my computer when suddenly she appeared in the doorway. She approached cautiously, tentatively. Her eyes darted around the room but focused on me and my movements as she got closer. She was prepared to run, if needed. Any sudden movement from me and she would do just that.

I kept pretending to type away as I watched her, out of the corner of my eye, lay down. She was just out of reach, but close enough I could hear her breathing. I held my breath, afraid to breathe, afraid to move. I didn’t want to scare her.

We sat like that for some time before I was able to breathe again and make some attempt at acting normally. Inside, my mind was racing. She actually approached me! My scared, puppy mill mom of a dog, Daisy, had decided to trust me enough to lay down near me! Wow. This was big.

I watched as she fought to keep her head up, afraid to completely relax near me and sleep. But, eventually, sleep won out and her head dropped down until it was completely resting on the floor. I let her lay there. I didn’t make an attempt to touch her then, but I would over the next few days.

That was the first day. That was the day that led to Daisy’s favorite thing… belly rubs. As Daisy started to get more comfortable around me, and started to feel safe enough to lay near me, I started to inch forward and give her little belly scratches. She loved them. She wanted more of them.

As soon as I laid down on the floor with my computer, she would come into the room and lay down near me, stretching her belly out for me to scratch it. It made me laugh. It made me smile. Who would have believed a belly rub would be the thing that opened the door to her trust? Certainly not me.

As time progressed, Daisy discovered that belly rubs could also be given on the couch, in my bed as a morning wake up routine, and even outside, on the cool, prickly grass. I know Daisy loves them because she seeks them often, but the truth is, I love giving them because they make her so happy. She might not have had these for the fist four years of her life, but she darn well would have them as often as she wanted them for the rest of her life with me.

Now, one of my favorite morning routine includes that moment when I get to lay my head on Daisy’s body and rub her belly. This is our moment. It’s just me and my dog; her and her human.

It’s a reminder of how far we have come. It’s a reminder of what is possible when love and trust are given freely. Daisy loves belly rubs and I love her. What could be better?

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Koi Daisy! Koi! – A Look Back

September 4, 2013 2 comments

Daisy in the ElementToday I am taking another look back to the early years when Daisy first came to live with me. ¬†Daisy is a former puppy mill breeding dog who was estimated to be four years old at the time I adopted her. She was afraid of everyone and everything. She practically crawled on the ground the first few days she came to live with me. This is an old blog post from Daisy’s blog, “Daisy the Wonder Dog (and how she found her Inner Lab).” It highlights the progress Daisy had made after I adopted her in 2007.

I hope it gives hope to those who have a damaged or unsocialized dog. Progress can be made. It takes time and patience and often happens in fits and starts Рfor every step forward there are two steps back, but it is so rewarding when you start to take those steps forward.  The key is to never give up hope. You need a lot of patience and understanding. You also need learn to learn to celebrate the small successes.

This post is from September 6, 2009, almost 2  years after Daisy first came to live with me.

Daisy had a little adventure yesterday and I couldn’t resist sharing it.

You may not know this, but before Jasper joined our family, Daisy would often accompany me on client appointments. This was partly because Daisy was so frantic when I left her at home alone, but also because it was a way to expose her to different situations, people and animals and help her to expand her horizons. Sometimes she would walk with me and a client and at other times she would wait in the car (Please note: Daisy never went with me if it was too warm or too cold out for her to remain in the car).

Having Jasper as a companion has helped Daisy to be more calm at home, so she has not been traveling with me as often. Yesterday however, I thought I would take her with me as a treat. She loves it when she can go with me on my rounds.

Our first stop was to check in on a Labrador Retriever (who is almost an exact replica of Daisy) and a French Bulldog – both of whom are absolutely adorable and sweet. They love other dogs, so I wasn’t worried that Daisy would have to remain in the car. First, I let the boys out to go potty. Once that was done I let Daisy out of the car. Everyone set about sniffing each other. Once the introductions had been made, we leashed up and set out on a walk together. Both the boys and Daisy love to walk (and what a lovely day to do so!). The sun was out. It was warm, but not hot, and the birds were singing up a storm.

When we returned, we headed out back to feed the Koi fish. The Koi pond is covered with netting over three-quarters of the pond (Blue Heron’s and Kingfishers have been gorging themselves on Koi, so the netting protects them from these interlopers), while the remaining one-quarter of the pond is covered with beautiful green lily pads. The fish have learned to be cautious, so they mostly stay under the lily pads, only adventuring out when they feel brave or when they know food is coming.

The boys followed me as I stepped into the porch area to grab a scoop of the fish food. Daisy was busy exploring her surroundings, sniffing the plants and trees surrounding the Koi pond. I carried the scoop of fish food back to the pond. The fish saw me coming and started to come out from under the lily pads and swim towards the top to get their food. Who said fish aren’t smart?

As I spread the last of the food along the top of the pond, I turned to head back to the porch, and that was when I saw her. My Daisy. After sniffing the yard, she had returned to the stone sitting area to sniff. As I turned, I watched Daisy walk, nose to the ground, straight into the Koi pond. You know that moment in a movie where something momentous happens in slow motion and the main character, shouts “Noooooooooooooo!!!” in slow motion? Well, that was me as I watched Daisy walk straight into the pond.

Imagine Daisy’s surprise as she stepped forward and fell down into the lily pads and water. She had no idea that the lily pads weren’t a part of the stone area. Honestly, it never occurred to me that she wouldn’t know there was water there. Poor girl!

She came up sputtering and immediately headed towards the edge of the pond. Amazingly, she did not panic, but rather swam to the edge of the pool and started to pull herself up. I raced to grab her, but she slipped back in. “Oh no!” I thought, “She’s going to panic! And, I’m going to have a hard time getting her out again.” But, I was wrong. Not my Daisy. She quickly swam to the edge again and pulled herself completely out on her own (with a little help from me as I grabbed her collar).

Given her background, I thought she would be totally freaked out and running scared. I was wrong again. Daisy simply shook herself off, looked back at the pond, and then set about sniffing again. I was floored. Was this my scared little Daisy? The one who was so afraid of everything and anything new or different? Who would have been absolutely freaked out if this had happened a year ago?

I guess not! Who would have thought that Daisy could be so nonchalant about something that would have been so frightening to her in the past. Simply put, I was in awe of her. I think Daisy’s progress is a testament to what encouragement, patience and love can do for a puppy mill dog. I was so proud of her.

But, I still think I will shout “Koi! Daisy Koi!” if we are ever faced with this circumstance again.

(As a last note: No Koi or lily pads were hurt in the making of this accident, and the netting was spared because luckily Daisy fell in the one-quarter part covered in lily pads.)

Koi pond

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