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Are these dogs having fun or not? I weigh in with my observations.

June 24, 2014 7 comments

Yesterday, I shared a video (see below) of two Great Danes interacting with one another and asked you to weigh in. It was great to see so many responses and to see so many tune in to the behaviors and over all reactions by the fawn-colored Dane, Dexter. There were quite a few people who said they would have intervened or would have left the park. I have to agree. I probably would have left. When my dog is not having fun it is time to go. The goal is to make sure that they have as many positive interactions as possible.

I still see in my mind the woman who came to our dog park with her cattle dog. The dog was clearly afraid to be there and kept hiding behind her owner and jumping up on her for reassurance as dogs chased her or tried to get her to play. The owner’s reaction was to knee her in the chest. Augh! Talk about an owner completely ignorant of her dog’s body language and needs.

Anyways, back to the video. Below is my assessment of what I saw – not only in terms of body language, but in summary form as well.

So what do you think? Did I miss something that you may have noticed? Feel free to share!


My assessment

The two dogs involved:

  • Dexter (fawn-colored Great Dane)
  • Austin Gray (gray Great Dane)
In the first 6 seconds of the video, both Austin and Dexter seem relaxed and friendly. 
  • Bodies are side by side and heads are turned slightly towards one another.
  • Dexter paws out at Austin and Austin moves sideways with Dexter following.
  • Dexter’s mouth is relaxed and his tail is wagging at mid-height.
  • Dexter sniffs at Austin’s privates and Austin turns head slightly towards Dexter. Tail is wagging at mid-height.
  • Austin darts down and away from Dexter.
The video transitions to another moment in time.
  • Dexter is seen walking away from another dog in a relaxed gait and tail up.
  • Austin runs in towards Dexter’s side and places his head over Dexter’s shoulder and leans into his side.
  • Dexter turns his head sideways towards Austin and leans away, turns head and lifts paw.
  • Austin jumps up and swipes his paw up onto Dexter’s butt.
  • At 12 seconds – Dexter spins towards Austin.
  • At 14 seconds, Dexter’s head is high and turned towards Austin. His body is leaning forward. He makes a move to sniff Austin’s privates again, stops and then turns his head to the side.
  • Austin’s body position is slightly hunched, tail is wagging in a fast side to side manner, his head is turned towards Dexter.
  • At 16 seconds, Austin jumps sideways to Dexter and forces head over Dexter’s shoulder.
  • Dexter moves slightly away from him, his ears are back, and his tail is down.
  • Austin places both paws on Dexter’s back and mounts him.
  • Another dog enters the scene as Austin puts his paws up on Dexter’s back.
  • When Austin mounts, Dexter turns one way and then they other to get Austin off his back.
  • The 3rd dog appears to lunge towards Dexter for a second before he runs off.
  • Dexter gets Austin off his back, but Austin immediately places one of his paws on his back and tries to mount him again.
  • Dexter whips around towards Austin, teeth are bared as he lunges towards him.
  • Austin leans his body down and away from Dexter and then runs sideways away from Dexter.
  • Dexter lunges toward him again, teeth bared.
  • Dexter pursues Austin mouth open and teeth bared. Austin veers away. They both stop standing almost side by side as they exchange a look.
  • Austin looks away and wags tail slowly. Tail is high.
  • Dexter looks away and starts to move away from Dexter. His fur is pileated.
  • Austin pounces towards him and then stands with body leaning backwards and tail wagging.
  • Dexter freezes and Austin looks away.
  • Dexter leans towards him and Austin leaps away playfully. Dexter walks trots away.
This same type of behavior continues throughout the next 3 minutes. Dexter conveys his desire to be left alone in numerous ways – look aways, pileated fur on his back and neck, body freezes, stares, turning away, running away, lunging and baring teeth. Multiple times Dexter goes back towards the woman in the blue coat (his owner) as if to say “save me!”, but instead she pushes him back towards Austin or merely walks away. Close to the 3-minute mark, Dexter completely runs away. But between the 3 and 4 minute mark, Dexter seems to engage with Austin. He runs away, but comes back and re-engages. He’s no longer lunging with teeth bared, but actually doing mouthing gestures with a soft mouth. At 3:55 he actually does a play bow and Austin returns it.
Summary:
Dexter is clearly not comfortable with Austin’s play style. He may not have a lot of experience with other dogs (or other Great Danes), but  whether or not he does, he clearly is not comfortable. Over and over again, he runs away from Austin and looks for ways to disengage. To be honest, Austin is a little too forward and ignores Dexter’s body language over and over again. His constant move to mount is clearly not something Dexter likes or wants to tolerate. I would have wanted Austin’s owner to intervene to stop the behavior.
However, despite Austin’s behavior, there are also times when Dexter  seems to enjoy engaging with him (e.g., in the middle and  end of the video). He even offers a play bow and Austin returns it.
One thing I did notice is that Dexter appeared to be extremely uncomfortable whenever a third dog entered the group. Hit may have been too overwhelming for him, especially if he is relatively inexperienced in playing with other dogs, he seemed to make a point of removing himself from the situation whenever a third dog joined the group.
If I had been the owner, I would have given Dexter a break and removed him from the park. . While he eventually does engage with Austin later on and does end up playing with him, the appears uncomfortable and nervous for most of the video, constantly running away from Austin and the situation. Many times he goes to his owner for relief and she ignores him or pushes him back into the fray. I think a better option would have been to leave and let Dexter have some time to relax and not feel stressed out. Forcing a dog to endure an uncomfortable or fearful situation can be a recipe for trouble. Dog parks are not for every dog and knowing how your dog feels in one should be of paramount importance. In the end, understanding what your dog is saying can be the difference between a successful interaction and a not so good one.

Are these dogs having fun or not? You decide.

June 23, 2014 13 comments

I think for many of us, recognizing when dogs are playing and when they are not can be difficult. Most of the time it isn’t until it has gone to the next level that we realize it is not play at all.

I remember the first time I brought my dog, Aspen, to a dog park. I wasn’t sure what behaviors I should consider safe or what should be considered concerning. I didn’t always recognize when she wasn’t having fun anymore and I should intervene. Thankfully, Aspen was very sophisticated in dog speak and would walk away when she didn’t like a dog’s behavior, and if they didn’t listen, she would give them a warning to let them know she had had enough.

Since having Aspen, I’ve gotten much better at reading dog body language in my dogs as well as in other dogs. I am more likely to intervene where I think trouble is about to start, but has not yet escalated, because I can see one dog is not having fun or there is a bullying situation going on.

Do you know when your dog is having fun and when he/she is not? Are you able to recognize when play has turned into something else?

I thought I would share a video of two (sometimes three) Great Danes interacting with one another at the park and let you weigh in. These dogs may be playing or not playing. They may or may not be having fun. Can you tell the difference?

What do you see in the first two to three minutes of this video?

Are the dogs having fun or not?

What body movements does each dog make that leads you to your conclusion?

Feel free to share what body movements or other things in the video stood out and helped you make your decision. If you get a chance scoot ahead and watch the last 2 minutes of the video. What do you see? Does it change your mind?

I’ll weigh in tomorrow and share my observations and what I think was happening. I look forward to your comments! (You can now see my assessment below.)

Favorite Video Friday – The Young Once, Happy Dogs

December 15, 2011 6 comments

Recently, I was feeling a bit nostalgic for the snowy winter days of my childhood. You know those snowy days that had an almost magical quality to them and made you feel as if the only thing that mattered was the beauty that surrounded you. The adult world was something you weren’t required to be concerned about and snow days were always something to look forward to – sledding all day followed by a good cup of hot cocoa and maybe a nap.

I’m not sure if it was that nostalgia that made me choose this week’s video or if it was the music that accompanied it. Either way, there is a innocence here that appeals to me. These dogs seem so young and without a care in the world. I remember being that way once too. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Favorite Video Friday: How About A Little Kitty With That Yoga?

September 15, 2011 5 comments

Whew! I could use a little humor after yesterday’s post. How about you?

I saw this one on my friend’s Judy’s Facebook Group, Pet People (a wonderful Facebook group that shares stories, pictures and videos of pets. Join up if you can!) and even though it is not a dog video, I think you will find it just as humorous.

And, if that doesn’t float your boat, try rough housing with a 180 lb Great Dane (also from Judy).

Happy Friday everyone!

Favorite Video Friday – Honey the Great Dane

August 4, 2011 9 comments

I saw the cute little video below featuring Honey the Great Dane and Lemon the cat. I thought it would be a fun one to share with you all today. But, then I saw another video featuring the very same Honey and couldn’t help but share it too. After all, it’s not every day you see a Great Dane dog agility AND dancing!

Honey may be the luckiest and most adorable dog around. She certainly is loved. You can see more of Honey at www.bighoneydog.com

Enjoy! Happy Friday!

Favorite Video Friday: Dogs Home Alone

November 5, 2010 Leave a comment

What do you think your dogs are doing at home while you are away?
I think this video may be just the tip of the iceberg!

P.S. This video was created by a 13 year old. Can you believe it? The actual video is short,but they’ve included a video of how they made it at the end. Pretty cool!

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