Favorite Video Friday – Heading to the beach!

July 3, 2014 10 comments

This week’s Favorite Friday video just happens to fall on a special holiday (and my birthday), Independence Day. It’s a day to celebrate America, her founders, her people and those who have defended it over the years.

Today, I decided to combine a video with some pictures. I hope you enjoy them and the day. Seems like the perfect day to hit the beach and hang out with family and friends, doesn’t it? :)

Wishing you a Happy 4th of July and a great Friday!
Be safe and keep your dogs safe.

 

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Happy Independence Day 2

Categories: Uncategorized

Wordless Wednesday #194 – Party fun for the birthday boy

July 1, 2014 16 comments

Black and White Sunday #89 – Sweet Ruby

June 29, 2014 11 comments

#Camera360分享#

My thanks to our hosts for this blog hop Dachshund Nola and Sugar The Golden Retriever.

Unfortunately, WordPress.com doesn’t allow Java script so I can’t provide a direct link to the linky, but you can join here.

Favorite Video Friday – Dachshund Bahama Vacation

June 26, 2014 2 comments

It’s vacation time at Casa del Mel. We might not be going on any bog trips, but we are certainly going to have some fun!

It seemed like this week’s video was the perfect way to kick things off.

 

Happy Friday everyone!

Dog Bite she said/she said: How would you have handled this situation?

June 25, 2014 14 comments

I was kind of going to take a pass on a blog post today, but then, a friend sent me this… Tevlin: Rain or sleet can’t stop your mail, but a tiny dog can  (Star Tribune, dated June 25, 2014, by Jon Tevlin). Seriously. I’m not even kidding.

Here is a quick synopsis of the story:

  • 11 lb dog gets loose from its leash while out on a walk.
  • 11 lb dog runs to mail carrier and jumps up on her and barks.
  • Owner apologizes profusely and gathers dog up (one added detail) and she apologizes profusely.
  • The mail carrier does not react or say anything to the owner.
  • Next day, Minneapolis Animal Control visits owner and reports mail carrier claims she was bitten on inner thigh and has several puncture wounds.
  • Mail carrier claims to have gone to Urgent Care for treatment, but no photos can be provided.
  • Owner agrees to get dog trained and to keep her on a short leash and to keep dog inside when mail is delivered.
  • Next day, mail delivery is stopped for the entire building where the owner and dog reside.
  • Post office manager notifies residents that they can either get a P.O. box or get rid of Nano (the dog).
  • Post office manager refuses to respond to resident’s calls to discuss the issue.
  • Now owner must move out or euthanize her dog. (Her agreement with Animal Control forbids her from giving the dog away.)

Jack Russell Terrier SnarlingI can think of all kinds of cuss words I could use to describe how I am feeling about this story, but really, all I can think of is “Where the hell is the adult in this story?” I mean I read this and all I can see is a lot of miscommunication, lack of communication and just plain old poor communication. I don’t see a whole lot of negotiation or reasonable boundary setting. I don’t even see proof of the actual bite being shared.

So here is what I would love to do today. Instead of posting this story and having a bunch of people angry people post negative and hateful comments on my blog, I would love to have you, the reader, offer ideas of how this could have been handled differently. How would you have handled this if you were one of the adults in this story? 

Feel free to rewrite it in a way that you think it could have gone if people had communicated effectively. How could it have been handled in a way that was better for all involved? What would you have done if you were any one of the parties involved in this situation?

I really look forward to hearing your ideas.

 

Wordless Wednesday #193 – By the Lake

June 25, 2014 13 comments

Are these dogs having fun or not? I weigh in with my observations.

June 24, 2014 7 comments

Yesterday, I shared a video (see below) of two Great Danes interacting with one another and asked you to weigh in. It was great to see so many responses and to see so many tune in to the behaviors and over all reactions by the fawn-colored Dane, Dexter. There were quite a few people who said they would have intervened or would have left the park. I have to agree. I probably would have left. When my dog is not having fun it is time to go. The goal is to make sure that they have as many positive interactions as possible.

I still see in my mind the woman who came to our dog park with her cattle dog. The dog was clearly afraid to be there and kept hiding behind her owner and jumping up on her for reassurance as dogs chased her or tried to get her to play. The owner’s reaction was to knee her in the chest. Augh! Talk about an owner completely ignorant of her dog’s body language and needs.

Anyways, back to the video. Below is my assessment of what I saw – not only in terms of body language, but in summary form as well.

So what do you think? Did I miss something that you may have noticed? Feel free to share!


My assessment

The two dogs involved:

  • Dexter (fawn-colored Great Dane)
  • Austin Gray (gray Great Dane)
In the first 6 seconds of the video, both Austin and Dexter seem relaxed and friendly. 
  • Bodies are side by side and heads are turned slightly towards one another.
  • Dexter paws out at Austin and Austin moves sideways with Dexter following.
  • Dexter’s mouth is relaxed and his tail is wagging at mid-height.
  • Dexter sniffs at Austin’s privates and Austin turns head slightly towards Dexter. Tail is wagging at mid-height.
  • Austin darts down and away from Dexter.
The video transitions to another moment in time.
  • Dexter is seen walking away from another dog in a relaxed gait and tail up.
  • Austin runs in towards Dexter’s side and places his head over Dexter’s shoulder and leans into his side.
  • Dexter turns his head sideways towards Austin and leans away, turns head and lifts paw.
  • Austin jumps up and swipes his paw up onto Dexter’s butt.
  • At 12 seconds – Dexter spins towards Austin.
  • At 14 seconds, Dexter’s head is high and turned towards Austin. His body is leaning forward. He makes a move to sniff Austin’s privates again, stops and then turns his head to the side.
  • Austin’s body position is slightly hunched, tail is wagging in a fast side to side manner, his head is turned towards Dexter.
  • At 16 seconds, Austin jumps sideways to Dexter and forces head over Dexter’s shoulder.
  • Dexter moves slightly away from him, his ears are back, and his tail is down.
  • Austin places both paws on Dexter’s back and mounts him.
  • Another dog enters the scene as Austin puts his paws up on Dexter’s back.
  • When Austin mounts, Dexter turns one way and then they other to get Austin off his back.
  • The 3rd dog appears to lunge towards Dexter for a second before he runs off.
  • Dexter gets Austin off his back, but Austin immediately places one of his paws on his back and tries to mount him again.
  • Dexter whips around towards Austin, teeth are bared as he lunges towards him.
  • Austin leans his body down and away from Dexter and then runs sideways away from Dexter.
  • Dexter lunges toward him again, teeth bared.
  • Dexter pursues Austin mouth open and teeth bared. Austin veers away. They both stop standing almost side by side as they exchange a look.
  • Austin looks away and wags tail slowly. Tail is high.
  • Dexter looks away and starts to move away from Dexter. His fur is pileated.
  • Austin pounces towards him and then stands with body leaning backwards and tail wagging.
  • Dexter freezes and Austin looks away.
  • Dexter leans towards him and Austin leaps away playfully. Dexter walks trots away.
This same type of behavior continues throughout the next 3 minutes. Dexter conveys his desire to be left alone in numerous ways – look aways, pileated fur on his back and neck, body freezes, stares, turning away, running away, lunging and baring teeth. Multiple times Dexter goes back towards the woman in the blue coat (his owner) as if to say “save me!”, but instead she pushes him back towards Austin or merely walks away. Close to the 3-minute mark, Dexter completely runs away. But between the 3 and 4 minute mark, Dexter seems to engage with Austin. He runs away, but comes back and re-engages. He’s no longer lunging with teeth bared, but actually doing mouthing gestures with a soft mouth. At 3:55 he actually does a play bow and Austin returns it.
Summary:
Dexter is clearly not comfortable with Austin’s play style. He may not have a lot of experience with other dogs (or other Great Danes), but  whether or not he does, he clearly is not comfortable. Over and over again, he runs away from Austin and looks for ways to disengage. To be honest, Austin is a little too forward and ignores Dexter’s body language over and over again. His constant move to mount is clearly not something Dexter likes or wants to tolerate. I would have wanted Austin’s owner to intervene to stop the behavior.
However, despite Austin’s behavior, there are also times when Dexter  seems to enjoy engaging with him (e.g., in the middle and  end of the video). He even offers a play bow and Austin returns it.
One thing I did notice is that Dexter appeared to be extremely uncomfortable whenever a third dog entered the group. Hit may have been too overwhelming for him, especially if he is relatively inexperienced in playing with other dogs, he seemed to make a point of removing himself from the situation whenever a third dog joined the group.
If I had been the owner, I would have given Dexter a break and removed him from the park. . While he eventually does engage with Austin later on and does end up playing with him, the appears uncomfortable and nervous for most of the video, constantly running away from Austin and the situation. Many times he goes to his owner for relief and she ignores him or pushes him back into the fray. I think a better option would have been to leave and let Dexter have some time to relax and not feel stressed out. Forcing a dog to endure an uncomfortable or fearful situation can be a recipe for trouble. Dog parks are not for every dog and knowing how your dog feels in one should be of paramount importance. In the end, understanding what your dog is saying can be the difference between a successful interaction and a not so good one.
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